A Eulogy for 'But What About Harvey Weinstein, Tho?'

Illustration for article titled A Eulogy for But What About Harvey Weinstein, Tho?
Screenshot: CNN (YouTube)

We regret to inform you that “But What About Harvey Weinstein, Tho?”—the bizarre and increasingly popular defense of R. Kelly, Russell Simmons, Bill Cosby and any other black man some (idiots) feel has been unfairly persecuted and scapegoated by the media, feminists, black women, SANS (simp-ass niggas), Oprah Winfrey, Gayle King, and the Illuminati—has died today at two years old.

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It was created in a lab of ash and dog-eared copies of The 48 Laws of Power in the fall of 2017, when people who don’t actually watch the news or possess things like “good sense” and “perspective” and “empathy” and “lotion” and “clean bedsheets” began to believe that it was an effective way of articulating a conspiracy to vilify black men while allowing white men to go scot-free. This defense existed despite the fact that Weinstein was literally on trial for rape and has had multiple documentaries produced about him, information that could be discovered by just googling “Weinstein.” (Note: It even comes up in the search results for “Weins.”)

Scholars have argued that “But What About Harvey Weinstein, Tho?” was less about a white man facing justice and more about wanting black men to have the same freedom to be above the law as white men often do. Some believe those scholars are full of shit. And those some are dumb.

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But What About Harvey Weinstein, Tho?” is survived by its cousins “But He Was About To Buy NBC, Tho” and “The Gay Agenda.” It will not be missed.

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB, a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, and the author of What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker (Ecco/HarperCollins)

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DISCUSSION

feministonfire
FeministOnFire

One fine morning...we overcame! Some women got some justice.

Now, now that Weinstein is guilty, do Black men have to start getting active consent?! Do Black men have to stop touching, grabbing, DRUGGING or overpowering women? Are all young Black girls now safe from lascivious acts by adult men? Will we actually start calling it rape when it happens to Black women in sexy clothes, backstage at concerts, in clubs where men go, in cars when men are driving, when women say No anytime during the act?! Will Black men now come to understand that just because they’ve been subjugated by racism, that just because they feel powerless and disrespected, that just because their dicks get hard doesn’t obligate Black women to provide a power-tripping orgasm and shut up about it?!

Or does all of that start TODAY?