Lake County Sheriffs Office via Getty Images

There aren't many stories that articulate how absurd and ridiculous America's relationship with race is better than this one. It is layers on layers on layers on layers on layers of ridiculous, dry rubbed with "What the fuck?" marinated in "This is some bullshit" and served with a generous helping of "You need more people" on a lightly toasted "No, seriously. Get the fuck outta here" kaiser roll.

Fox Lake Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz was a crooked cop who staged his own death in September. And he wasn't just run-of-the-mill crooked. He stole tens of thousands of dollars from a youth fund; using the cash on vacations, gym memberships, and porn. (Which, admittedly, aren't the worst things in the world to use your embezzled cash on. You can say many things about Charles Joseph Gliniewicz, but at least he wasn't boring.)


Sadly, this — an officer committing suicide — is not terribly uncommon or particularly newsworthy. As Shaun King pointed out earlier today, "cops are more likely to commit suicide than they are to die in an inner-city gun battle, by a targeted assassination or by a car crash from a high speed chase." But this isn't about Gliniewicz, who apparently was battling some serious demons. It's about the reflexive need to blame his death — back when it was still thought to be a homicide — on BlackLivesMatter. Which is what many people did. And, this wasn't just the usual pajama-clad neckbeards on Twitter and Fox News making this claim either. Ron Hosko, current president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund and a former assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division (yes, that FBI), wrote a piece in USA Today effectively blaming #BLM for creating the climate that led to Gliniewicz's murder. Which, again, wasn't a murder.

In summary, a movement created with the sole purpose of saying "Hey people in law enforcement and everyone else. We (Black people) don't like being shot. So please stop shooting us. Because we don't enjoy it" is considered so controversial, so subversive, and so offensive that a former director of the FBfuckingI named it — not a person or an entity or even a group of people in a shark suit, but a hashtag campaign — the prime suspect in a police officer's death. Without apparently knowing anything about the case, other than "dead White cop."

Layers on layers on layers on layers on layers.